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'Edible' Christmas Tree for Wildlife in Your Backyard

Lure nature right to your family's window by transforming an evergreen or shrub into a holiday banquet of yummy ornaments for birds and squirrels

This holiday season, why not get back to the basics of spending time with the people you care for most – by taking a moment to appreciate the natural world around you? Parents, look no farther than your backyard for inspiration!

The National Wild Turkey Federation NWTF invites families to decorate an "edible" Christmas tree. It's an activity that you can all do together. And, in the process, you can show your children the wonders of nature.

Pick a tree close to a picture window, snuggle up with a warm cup of cocoa and watch as your backyard becomes an instant landing zone – and buffet – for songbirds and squirrels with these creative, edible ornaments.

String of pearl

With a needle and thread, string together different kinds of grapes. For a dash of color, alternate grapes with raisins and cranberries.

Popcorn party

String together popcorn – but make sure that it's all natural; no butter or salt added.

Crackers or Cheerios bracelet

String together salt-free crackers (think Ritz, or the types that have small holes) or Cheerios in the shape of a bracelet to slide over the tips of branches.

Apple and orange slices

Thinly slice apples and oranges, string through a bit of thread in each, and hang each piece separately from branches.

Millet delight

Purchase millet from your feed and seed store; top with a red ribbon and hang it from the tree.

Bird bags

Buy netting material and fill it with birdseed. Hint: Adding finely crushed eggshells to the mix will provide the birds with calcium!

Peanut heaven

String raw peanuts and loop them together. Finish off with a colorful ribbon.

Pinecone pleasure

Collect pinecones of all sizes. Attach a ribbon loop to the top of each one. Combine peanut butter and oatmeal, spread the mixture over the pinecone and roll it in birdseed. Then, hang on the tree.

Suet loot

Melt beef fat or bacon grease and let it cool. Add birdseed, peanut butter, fruit or granola. Mesh onion bags make great suet containers and are easy to hang!

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