Fair   37.0F  |  Forecast »

Imaginary Friends: The Benefits of Your Kid's Scapegoat, Confidant and Alter Ego

By and large, pretend pals can be a means to help children explore boundaries, new situations and more. Here's how they're useful – and what parents can do about them.

(page 2 of 2)

Taylor first became interested in imaginary friends when her own daughter brought home stories about a boy named Michael Rose.

"I thought he was someone at the day care. I wanted to find out who this person was and I asked around," Taylor says. "I found out that he had a barnful of giraffes."

Taylor quickly realized Michael Rose wasn't real, but wondered if her daughter really believed in him.

Taylor's first study, which interviewed 83 children with imaginary friends, showed all but one clearly knew their imaginary friends were just pretend.

"Somewhere in the interview they would want to clarify things: 'You know it's just make believe.' It was almost like they wanted to make sure we weren't getting confused about it," Taylor says.

According to Taylor, there are many reasons children concoct invisible friends.

"They are very useful entities," Taylor says. "It's a way to sort of mull over the things going on in their lives."

If there's a bully at school, a child might create an imaginary friend she can reprimand at home. If someone the child loves is sick, he might break out the toy doctor kit for his invisible patient.

Imaginary friends may be used as a bargaining chip or scapegoat, as in "Sally doesn't go to bed until 9 p.m.," or "She spilled it, not me."

They can also change over time and become more elaborate.

"When you're playing pretend, you can do whatever you want," Taylor says.

In the shadows

Imaginary friends often get a bad rap. Who can forget Tony in The Shining, who lived in Danny Torrance's mouth and eventually possessed his mind (think REDRUM)? Sigmund Freud claimed imaginary companions were a means by which children compensated for an unhappy, disturbed or lonely childhood. Even today, imaginary friends are described on Wikipedia as a "psychological and social disorder."

In the past, a child with an imaginary companion might have been considered peculiar, shy or even troubled, Taylor says, but modern research shows the reality is much more positive – and interesting.

"It's a healthy type of pretend play," Taylor says.

One common misconception is that shy children are more likely to create imaginary companions to make up for a lack of friends in real life. Taylor dispels that myth.

"Children who are less shy are more likely to have imaginary friends, which is the opposite of the stereotype," she says.

Children with imaginary friends are better able to focus their attention and to see things from another person's perspective, Taylor has found.

Taylor's research has also shown that while imaginary friends are less common in adolescence, they do exist. In one study, she and her team looked at 152 at-risk 12-year-olds and followed up at age 18. Thirteen of the youth had imaginary friends – and fared comparatively well in life based on indicators like graduating high school and avoiding arrests, mental illness and drug abuse.

"We found those kids were much more likely to meet those criteria than other children," Taylor says. "An imaginary friend was not a red flag. If anything, it's a sign of resilience."

Above all, Taylor says having an imaginary playmate is just plain fun.

Taylor says parents should relax and enjoy it. Express interest in what your child creates and you may get some insight into his wonderful little mind. Wonder if he likes the new babysitter? Ask what his imaginary friend thinks.

"Sometimes they'll talk about things they're not comfortable with and attribute it to imaginary friends," Taylor says.

But Taylor cautions not to get too eager to share in an imaginary friendship or you'll end up a third wheel.

"Children like to have ownership over imaginary friends, so getting too involved in it makes it less fun," she says. "They'll often give it up if you take too much control."

Add your comment:
Advertisement

More »Latest Articles & Blog Posts

Craft Roundup: Muppets Most Wanted Inspired DIY Fun

Craft Roundup: Muppets Most Wanted Inspired DIY Fun

These cool DIY projects are a blast for kids and families to make, all celebrating Disney's latest movie spin on the classic Muppet gang.

Tax Tips for Parents: Deductions and Credits to Know About

Tax Tips for Parents: Deductions and Credits to Know About

April 15 is the IRS tax filing deadline, aka Tax Day. Whether you've got a baby or a college kid, here's how to get the most out of your income tax returns.

9 Month Bump Maternity Apparel Boutique in Trenton

9 Month Bump Maternity Apparel Boutique in Trenton

This downriver area consignment store is stocked with lots of trendy gently used options for new and expecting moms, plus handmade baby gifts and more.

Glass Action! Ferndale Mom Makes Cool Stained Glass Stuff

Glass Action! Ferndale Mom Makes Cool Stained Glass Stuff

Along with her iconic rock 'n' roll nightlights, Carey Gustafson makes custom portraits of kids, parents, pets and more, perfect for a cool family gift

Kid-Friendly Matzo Recipes for Passover

Kid-Friendly Matzo Recipes for Passover

Make this Jewish holiday memorable for your family with these creative recipes – from matzo grilled cheese to matzo lasagna.

Paint Wood-Turned Egg Forms for an Easter Treat that Lasts

Paint Wood-Turned Egg Forms for an Easter Treat that Lasts

Why not try a more eco-friendly version of plastic eggs with your family this holiday season? This DIY project is super customizable and makes great decor.

Local Mom Pepper Sprays Chuck E. Cheese's Patrons in Troy

Local Mom Pepper Sprays Chuck E. Cheese's Patrons in Troy

A Hamtramck woman's anger got the best of her at a southeast Michigan location of this kids party chain. What sparked her frustration at fellow patrons?

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement