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Ideas for Inspiring Kids to Read

With all their free time during the summer, it's the perfect time for your children to read. Here are some ways to spark their interest in books.

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Summer is a super time for kids to spend their spare time getting engrossed in reading. Your child doesn't have to be a bookworm to get hooked on a good book or two. Here's how you can help …

Visit your local library

Head to your nearest library with your child and sign up for their summer reading program. These programs offer ways for your kids to keep track of their reading progress and to receive rewards for their efforts. Often there are activities taking place throughout the summer in connection with the reading program to encourage kids to keep at it.

Find a book series or author your child enjoys

Help your child explore different book series to find a favorite. What's great about book series is that your child will want to read more books to find out what will happen next. You can ask about popular series based on your child's interests at your local library. Several seem to be perennial kid favorites, including Harry Potter, Amelia Bedelia, Arthur Adventure, Berenstain Bears, Curious George, Dr. Seuss, Goosebumps and Warriors.

Watch the movie after they've read the book

Give your child an incentive to read the book by promising you'll watch the movie adaptation after as a family. Another option is to read the book aloud together. Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Percy Jackson, Mr. Popper's Penguins, The Ant Bully and Doctor Doolittle are just a few of the many kids' books that have been turned into feature films.

Have a book party

If your child finds a book she just loves, why not have a party all around that book? For example, if she enjoys Alice in Wonderland, you can brainstorm ideas together about how to bring the book to life with your party activities. Who's up for a tea party?

Create a reading spot – or spots

Digging into a book may be more appealing to your child if he has a designated reading area. Maybe you can help him create a reading nook in his room or build a reading fort with pillows and blankets somewhere else in your house. Don't forget to think of outside locations like under a tree or on a chair on the porch.

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