Fair   70.0F  |  Forecast »

Eco Cleaning Your Home

Spruce up your house without all the chemicals with these five green cleaning tips

The sweet scents of spring shouldn't include Lysol, Drano and Windex. To get your house in ship-shape without the chemicals and costs, we turned to Jill Potvin Schoff's Green Up Your Cleanup and Amanda Musilli, marketing team leader for Whole Foods Market in Rochester Hills. Read on for their simple, Earth-friendly tips and elixirs.

1. Natural refills. Replenish your cleaning cabinet with all-natural cleaners. Many cleaning jobs can be done with products you may already have in your home, says Musilli of Whole Foods. For example, equal parts distilled white vinegar and water mix together to make a fantastic window cleaner. White vinegar also disinfects, cuts grease, removes mildew and odors. Baking soda, salt and lemon juice mixed together make a great tub and tile scrub. Or swing by a Restore Refill Station for an all-natural fill-up (they're available at select Whole Foods Markets locations).

2. Eco-friendlier dusting. Try reusable microfiber cloths; each has thousands of tiny fibers that pick up and trap dust, and they're reusable (as needed, just vacuum or launder them with other non-lint-producing fabrics). Or, Schoff notes in Green Up Your Cleanup, go a more-natural lambs' wool duster (microfiber cloths are petroleum-based). Hint: This is about all it takes to spruce up wooden furniture.

3. Outdoor furniture. As the weather breaks, keep the patio tables and chairs spiffy, according to Schoff's book. Wicker: Wipe down with warm water and a mild soap (hint: do it on a warm day, so it dries faster – and thereby prolongs the life of your furniture). Wooden: Lightly wipe with warm water and an all-purpose liquid cleaner. And for plastic: Read the next tip for an ideal general cleaner.

4. All-purpose liquid cleaner. From floors to cars, this recipe has you covered, Schoff notes. For a large area, just mix up a gallon of hot water, 1 tablespoon of baking soda, and 2 tablespoons of liquid soap or detergent. Add the soap last, to prevent it from over-foaming. Toss in a tablespoon of washing soda for heavy grease stains, or a tablespoon of borax to disinfect or kill mildew.

5. Toss toxins responsibly. If you do use store-bought cleaners, take the bottles to a certified waste management facility for disposal, says Musilli of Whole Foods. Want information on acceptable products and times of operation? Surf on to check the counties of Livingston, Macomb, Oakland, Washtenaw and Wayne. Or browse for some of Whole Foods' cleaning products – and, Scoff writes, as a general rule, avoid cleaners containing ammonia, bleach, alcohol, dyes and artificial fragrances.

Add your comment:
Advertisement

More »Latest Articles & Blog Posts

Capturing Memories with Project Life by Stampin' Up

Capturing Memories with Project Life by Stampin' Up

Looking for an easier way to save and display your family memories and keepsakes? This kit has what you need to make scrapbook journaling lots of fun.

Passport Rules for Kids

Passport Rules for Kids

If you're planning on traveling with your family outside of the country, they'll need a passport. Find out what you need and how to get passports for children.

Tips for Saving Cash on Flights

Tips for Saving Cash on Flights

Find out how your family can save money when flying abroad and in the country.

Tips for Traveling Internationally with Your Children

Tips for Traveling Internationally with Your Children

Thought about taking your kids for a trip abroad? You should! Here are tips to help make your cultural excursion easier – and cheaper – than you might think.

Staying Home Alone: How to Know When Your Child is Ready

Staying Home Alone: How to Know When Your Child is Ready

Whether you just want to run an errand or need to hit the gym for a break, it could be time to let your tween stay home alone. Here are a few ways to know your kid is prepared.

Craft Roundup: Get Ready for the Beach

Craft Roundup: Get Ready for the Beach

Whether you're hitting the pool or lake, southeast Michigan is packed with watery summer fun. These projects are inspired by (and ready for) this very topic!

Social Savvy: Raising Kids Who Can Make Connections

Social Savvy: Raising Kids Who Can Make Connections

At each stage of development, there are things parents can do for their kids to help them with social skills and making friendships.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement