Overcast   55.0F  |  Forecast »

Turkey Pancakes Recipe

Have fun with a different Thanksgiving Day meal – breakfast! – with this clever creation from 'OMG Pancakes,' a book by DIY dad Jim Belosic

You gotta give it up for this crafty gobbler. In griddle guru Jim Belosic's new book, OMG Pancakes! 75 Cool Creations Your Kids Will Love to Eat, this dad flips up some seriously inventive flapjacks – including this pancake turkey. It's a great pairing if you're catching America's Thanksgiving Parade over the breakfast table on Thanksgiving morning. Or, Belosic, who's also the guy behind JimsPancakes.com, says it's a pretty cool family Turkey Day dinner alternative: "Definitely less prep and cooking time!"

Here's the recipe, excerpted with the kind permission of Penguin Group.

Ingredients

  • Plain pancake batter
  • Natural brown food coloring or cocoa powder
  • Natural red food coloring or maraschino cherry juice
  • Three squeeze bottles (available at restaurant supply stores) or plastic baggies (cut corner tip off)
  • Flipper (the bigger, the better!)
  • Step-by-step illustrations for reference (click the image to download!)

Directions

  1. Split batter into three parts in three separate bowls, with the majority in one bowl (only a tiny amount in the other two). Add brown coloring to the largest portion, and red to one of the other two. Keep the last bit plain. Transfer batter into three separate squeeze bottles or baggies.
  2. Make the turkey in three parts: Body, tail and feet. Use brown batter to draw the shape of the body, neck and head. Fill in the outline, leaving a space for the eye. Use plain batter for the eye. Don't forget the wattle (use red batter for this).
  3. With more brown batter, form the base of the tail – as if you were making a chocolate rainbow. Let the base cook; then draw feather shapes with the red and plain batter, and connect them to the base. Arrange the feathers like the petals of a rose.
  4. Make feet by cooking a small shape for them on the griddle. This will be the stand for your finished masterpiece. After you've cooked all parts, assemble the body and tail together, like one of those balsa airplanes – "Tab A goes into Slot B." Then, put them onto the feet.
  5. To "plate" it, simply allow the turkey to stand on the plate and serve! Carving, of course, is optional. So is the gravy.

Add your comment:
Advertisement

More »Latest Articles & Blog Posts

Simple Halloween Projects Feature Candy, Milk Bottles, More

Simple Halloween Projects Feature Candy, Milk Bottles, More

These DIY October projects by eighteen25, tatertots & jello, Handmade Charlotte and Let's Eat Grandpa are so fun for parents and kids to make, it's frightening!

Meet Asher, Metro Parent October 2014 CoverKid – VIDEO

Meet Asher, Metro Parent October 2014 CoverKid – VIDEO

He's a prankster who loves archery and looks pretty at home on the farm. Meet this Ann Arbor 10-year-old.

Repairing Cleft Palates in Kids

Repairing Cleft Palates in Kids

Since John Paul Orlosky was diagnosed with cleft palate, he's had surgeries and setbacks but now can speak clearly – an outcome that's more common in the many kids who have this condition.

Halloween Picture Frame for Parties: Craft Idea

Halloween Picture Frame for Parties: Craft Idea

It's time for costumes and creepy decorations – Halloween is right around the corner! Capture some spooky moments at your party with this photo booth-ready frame

Local Puzzle Company Plymouth Puzzles

Local Puzzle Company Plymouth Puzzles

Parents Jeff and Karen Sisolaks founded the company Plymouth Puzzles, which makes wooden puzzles in unique shapes. They pose a fun challenge for families.

Animals and Family Farm Fun in Fall in Southeast Michigan

Animals and Family Farm Fun in Fall in Southeast Michigan

October brings a harvest of corn mazes and hayrides, autumn colors and barnyard critters. Sample the simple life with your kids at these agricultural havens.

Bloomfield Hills-Based Nonprofit Wish Upon a Teen

Bloomfield Hills-Based Nonprofit Wish Upon a Teen

The organization helps local teens with cancer, chronic illness and autism spectrum disorder to have teenage experiences, like making friends and going to events.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement