Fair   41.0F  |  Forecast »

MEAP Test Taking Tips for Kids

How parents can help kids in grades 3-9 prepare for these big Michigan standardized tests that cover reading, writing, math, science and more

For some children, standardized test taking at school is an exercise in anxiety, too. And the bigger the test – like the Michigan Educational Assessment Program, or MEAP – the bigger the worry!

But fortunately, there are some simple, low stress ways parents can help their students in grades 3-9 prepare for this statewide timed exam. Here's a quick look at what the MEAP is, and six ways you can get your child ready.

What is the MEAP?

Given in October, the MEAP measures how well students in grades 3-9 stack up against other children in the same grade. The 3-8 students are tested on reading, writing, English language arts and math. Also, 5-8 kids take a science test, while kids in grades 6-9 take a social studies test.

"Some kids freak when you tell them tests are timed," says Mary Ann Rosenthal of Kumon Math and Reading Center in Royal Oak, a tutoring chain. "Some are very afraid of time constraints."

She knows the drill: She was a teacher in the Berkley School District for a dozen years before serving as director of her Kumon branch for the past 20.

But the MEAP is timed for a reason: It measures what students know and are able to do, and determines if they are academically where they should be.

1. Do some timed practice drills

Although schools may have some test-taking practice, parents can run some drills at home, too.

Set up a kitchen timer and have your child do some problems and answer some questions. Challenge him to beat the clock.

"They'll be amazed at what they can do in 10 minutes," Rosenthal says.

2. Learn to stay focused

Make sure they are ready for the drill. If they need a drink of water, tell them to get it. If they need a snack, let them have it. They need to be comfortable so they can stay focused on the task at hand.

"Staying focused is a big deal. If they are looking around the room, it doesn't measure what they know," says Rosenthal.

3. Read the questions first

Preparing for a test is not an overnight deal – and reading skills are important. Students need to be able to read to follow directions and understand what is being asked in these tests (especially on story problems!).

One suggestion is for students to preview the questions before they read the informational paragraph. That way, students know what to look for in the reading portion and can better find the detail that will help answer the questions.

4. Key words in directions

Also, coach your kids to pay close attention to directions. One really handy tip is to underline key words. That way, their eyes can quickly go back to that core information as they puzzle through the questions that follow.

5. Get to know procedures and terms

And make sure your student is familiar with testing procedures – such as fill in the blank or multiple choice. Go over test terminology, too, such as the difference between synonyms and antonyms and "greater than" or "less than."

6. Encourage your child to 'do your best'

Of course, the age-old advice to get a good night's sleep and good breakfast still stands, Rosenthal says – "but they should be doing that every day."

But in addition, as the kids are leaving for school the morning of the test, "Parents need to keep a really positive attitude," Rosenthal advises. "This test is just a snapshot of how a child is doing on that particular day."

Encourage your children to do their best. It's only one test. If parents can get that idea across, it may help the kids relax during the testing.

Add your comment:
Advertisement

More »Latest Articles & Blog Posts

Upping the Prom Stakes: Teen Promposals Sweep High Schools

Upping the Prom Stakes: Teen Promposals Sweep High Schools

Prom? Kids are amping up the pitch with crazy creative presentations that rival wedding proposals – and, of course, posting the pix on social media.

Depression Risk is High for Young, First-Time Fathers

Depression Risk is High for Young, First-Time Fathers

It's common to hear talk about postpartum depression for moms. But, according to a new study, dads are feeling down, too, and suffering from paternal postpartum – or postnatal – depression.

Easter Treats Ideas – Recipes for the Kids

Easter Treats Ideas – Recipes for the Kids

Cupcakes, brownies, cake pops! These creative concoctions aren't just tasty – they're cute, too! Add some fun to your Easter celebrations with these sweets.

Make It Review: Rolli Stamps and Project Idea

Make It Review: Rolli Stamps and Project Idea

This cool new inked stamper product by Funnybone Muse is sure to be a family craft staple. Here's what it's about, and how to use it to jazz up a note card.

Craft Roundup: Muppets Most Wanted Inspired DIY Fun

Craft Roundup: Muppets Most Wanted Inspired DIY Fun

These cool DIY projects are a blast for kids and families to make, all celebrating Disney's latest movie spin on the classic Muppet gang.

Tax Tips for Parents: Deductions and Credits to Know About

Tax Tips for Parents: Deductions and Credits to Know About

April 15 is the IRS tax filing deadline, aka Tax Day. Whether you've got a baby or a college kid, here's how to get the most out of your income tax returns.

9 Month Bump Maternity Apparel Boutique in Trenton

9 Month Bump Maternity Apparel Boutique in Trenton

This downriver area consignment store is stocked with lots of trendy gently used options for new and expecting moms, plus handmade baby gifts and more.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement