From the March 2015 issue

Top New Books for Young Readers

With spring in the air, March is a perfect time to turn a new leaf – of paper, that is. After all, it’s also National Reading Month! Are you looking for a great new title to add to your family’s bookshelf? This is the list for you. Metro Parent got in touch with four local youth librarians to find out some of their favorite kids’ books that might have slipped by you in 2014. Happy page turning!

Peanut Butter & Cupcake!

By Terry Border

Making new friends doesn’t come easy for some kids, but this book puts the fun back in it. With real photographs, rich rhyming words and light humor using appealing snacks kids love, your child can come to understand friendship in a whole new way. $17.99. Philomel, 2014. Ages 3+.

“Peanut butter tries to do anything to make friends.”

– Janet Meyer, Kara Fredericks and Tracy Morsi, youth services, 
Clinton-Macomb Public Library 
(in Clinton and Macomb townships)

 

House of Robots

By James Patterson, Chris Grabenstein

When his genius mom invents a walking robot, fifth-grader Sammy becomes a class laughingstock as he is forced to take his “robo-bro,” E, to school each day. This quirky, quick read, with whimsical words and comic-like illustrations, is sure to keep kids engaged. $9.99. Little, Brown and Company 2014. Ages 8-12.

“Similar to Diary of a Wimpy Kid. It’s humorous and it appeals to middle schoolers.”

– Clinton-Macomb Public Library

 

Hooray for Hat!

By Brian Won

A gray, gloomy elephant wakes up grumpy and is surprised to see a fun hat wrapped up in a gift box outside his door. Discover how he spreads his newfound joy to others. $16.99. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014. Ages 4-8.

“This warm book shows how cheering up your friends when they’re down can be as simple as giving them a small gift and including them in your fun.”

– Andy Schuck, head of youth services, William P. Faust Public Library of Westland

 

Hug Machine

By Scott Campbell

With an open mind and arms, a boy takes an affectionate approach to life to cheer up everyone and everything. He just can’t keep his hugs to himself (warning: it’s infectious!). $16.99. Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2014. Ages 4-8.

“When I was done, I hugged the book.”

– Nicole Williams, youth librarian, Ann Arbor District Library

 

Fortunately, the Milk

By Neil Gaiman

Got milk? One family doesn’t in this twisted tale, so dad must pick some up while mom’s away at work. He returns with quite an tale to tell, filled with a talking stegosaurus and aliens. A hilarious story with lively, sketchy drawings, this is one kids will love. $14.99. HarperCollins, 2013. Ages 8-12.

“Good for reading quietly and aloud – and includes some wacky and energetic illustrations.”

– William P. Faust Public Library of Westland

 

Viva Frida

By Yuyi Morales

Vivid pictures tell Frida Kahlo’s story in this visually compelling book that uses expressive verbs to depict her artistic and creative process. Delve deep into her mind and follow her as she finds a little inspiration everywhere. $17.99. Roaring Book Press, 2014. Ages 4-8.

“It’s got some beautiful illustrations. It’s a nonfiction picture book, but it was a lot of fun.”

– Cindy Cares, youth services coordinator, Southfield Public Library

 

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