School System Proposes a Restriction on Skinny Jeans

Skinny jeans are a wardrobe staple for teens – and many adults – but this trendy pants aren’t supposed to be worn at a North Carolina school anymore.

A high school in North Carolina wants to restrict the wearing of skinny jeans, and teens and parents are furious about it.

The bulk of the school’s dress code policy is pretty standard, banning revealing clothing, hats and sunglasses, and any shorts or skirts that are deemed too short. However, they recently proposed to treat leggings and skinny jeans the same in that the ‘posterior’ must be fully covered by a top or dress.

The school claims that this rule would be to save ‘bigger girls’ from being bullied, which brings about a whole new mess of problems.

A lot of schools have these rules in place for leggings and yoga pants, which also angered students and some parents, but many people, including myself, saw the reasoning. But banning a certain type of jeans?

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Students tweeted out various reactions, but most of them were along the lines of: this rule is ridiculous.

Moms are outraged because their daughters, and let’s be real, all women, have different shapes and sizes, and sometimes it’s hard to find clothes to fit all bodies.

“My soccer girl has strong thick legs she’s not fat she is an athlete. Skinny jeans stretch to fit her best in waist & thighs #policy8520,” tweeted FutbolMom.

Kristi Moore tweeted, “How about I dress my kids and you stick to teaching them? Can you handle that?? #policy8520.”

Many moms feel the same way, that certain clothing fits their daughters better than others, and skinny jeans can stretch to fit many sizes, as well as be small enough for very skinny girls.

Students were much more colorful with their tweets, but they all said similar things.

“I’m sorry. Everything fits tight. I have thighs. Sorry. Oh no. SO WHAT,” tweeted Sam Lewis, a student at the high school. The same student also added, “this is ridiculous. What do you want me to wear? CURTAINS?”

Another student, Rach, took a more humorous approach, tweeting the following: “Finally, I’ll get a chance to wear my civil war dresses,” complete with pictures.

Overall, students and parents alike are not happy. Many are also wondering who will pay for new jeans, as many families have limited funds for new clothes.

Can we take a step back and look at this for a moment?

It hasn’t been that long since I was in high school, and I remember wondering what it is about my shoulder that has to be hidden. Many girls were outraged when high schools started banning yoga pants, and with reason to some extent.

But these are jeans, a very regular piece of clothing for teenagers, and if you’re a parent of a teenager, you’ve probably seen that skinny jeans are the majority of jeans sold today. It’s hard to find a different styles.

Some parts of dress codes make sense, but their reasoning for asking girls to cover up is hovering dangerously over victim blaming and body shaming. It’s understandable if a school doesn’t want bullying, but that’s up to the school to discipline the bullies.

In my opinion, skinny jeans are perfectly acceptable, and if girls are bullied for how their bodies look, they shouldn’t be told it’s their fault for wearing what they’re comfortable in.

Is this rule a step too far? Is it justified? Let us know in the comments!

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